Adam Teacha Barnes

                                                  Adam Teacha Barnes

When one thinks of an elementary school teacher or a middle school social science teacher the first thing that comes to mind is not a reggae musician. Most of my experience in teaching through music has been from an Afro centric point of view, the roots of reggae. For me, this is the origin of humanity. Everything that we experience in American music containing soul has come from the African Diaspora, which is the movement of the black people throughout the Western world. From this catastrophe there are elements of beauty shining through the darkness. I was first introduced to reggae music when my friends came back from Jamaica with a plethora of reggae albums. We listened to Clint O’Neil religiously on the radio fighting through the pops and cracks interference, not much different than life. Continuing with this fascination of this bouncing looping African sound which is in simplistic form and rich in sound. It is profound. Unlike pulling a plant out of the garden looking at deep dark roots moist, black and connected. This is where I found my home. I was obsessed in a good way with this simple sound. Ghetto roots of this island far away in the Caribbean. I am blessed to have performed with reggae veteran producers Dennis Stone and Henry K and I have also been on three of their reggae albums. I would have never dreamed of that as a child in my room at 13, sitting with my casio keyboard transforming preset rhythms into reggae rhythms by slowing down the tempo and removing elements. Life is good. Reggae on…

 

 

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